Marriage Allowance Tax Benefits

In the UK, the HMRC allows you transfer £1,250 of your personal tax allowance to your husband, wife or civil partner. This reduces the overall amount of tax you pay as a couple, and it can be backdated for a number of years. It’s a genuine scheme that may benefit some (but not all) couples, although they don’t advertise it very well.

It’s easy to claim this via the HMRC website, or (as we did recently) by telephone. The only problem we encountered was a long wait to get through to someone, but when we did they were very helpful.

There’s nothing to pay, and possibly lots to gain.

Beware googling ‘marriage tax allowance’. Some shyster firms will charge you for applying (they try to look official), but it’s FREE to apply. Follow our guide and the correct links below to do it safely and at no cost. Source

Unfortunately, there are many companies who offer to do it for you, and charge you up to (and sometimes over) 50% of any backdated tax refund. This could be over £500 for something you can easily do yourself, they simply require the same information you have to give HMRC. They are totally legal scams.

The HMRC website and the one quoted above are really helpful.

Note: I’m not an accountant and this post isn’t financial advice, merely pointing out something you might benefit from and a danger to be aware of. Please do your own homework and make your own financial decisions.

Make a donation: If (as a result of reading this) you save some money, please consider making a donation towards the running costs of this non-profit and free from advertising blog. Click here. Regards, John.

Spotting Hoaxes and Scams Online

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I’m sometimes amazed at the things people share on Facebook and other social media sites without first checking their veracity. NO, Facebook doesn’t have a new algorithm that limits the number of friends you see, and NO, your favourite supermarket isn’t going to give £75 to every customer – just STOP and think before sharing.

There’s a great way of checking if something is a hoax or a scam, it’s called Google. If you come across something you think might be a hoax or scam on Facebook or elsewhere, simply Google it and add the word ‘hoax’ or ‘scam’ to the search terms. Always works for me. There’s also a couple of useful sites for checking; namely Snopes and Hoax-Slayer, and both have a presence on Facebook.

Fake news is something else altogether, that’s sometimes more difficult to spot; but also watch out for satirical sites before reacting. Think before sharing, if it looks dodgy it probably is. Rant over!

See also: Living in a social media bubbleSecurity for Facebook