Baby Driver (Movie)

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Naomi and I watched Baby Driver recently and thoroughly enjoyed it, although it’s somewhat violent and sweary at times (not for the faint-hearted or easily offended). Overall it’s very stylish, stands out from the crowd and keeps your attention, although the script was ordinary and some of the characters could have been better defined.

A talented, young getaway driver relies on the beat of his personal soundtrack to be the best in the game. When he meets the girl of his dreams, Baby sees a chance to ditch his criminal life and make a clean getaway. (Bing search).

I particularly appreciated the soundtrack as this was an integral part of the storyline in a way I’ve not come across before, rather than (as is usual) accompaniment to the action and helping to set the mood.

The movie stars Ansel Elgort, Lily James, and Kevin Spacey (are we still allowed to watch his movies in the light of recent events?) amongst others. In fact, the reason Naomi bought the DVD was because it starred Lily James, who plays the young Donna in Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again.

The whole time I was waiting for the song Baby Driver by Simon and Garfunkel from their album Bridge Over Troubled Water; but I needn’t have worried, it starts before and plays through the end credits.

Note: I’ve created the soundtrack on Spotify, click here.

The Martian (Andy Weir)

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The other day I borrowed (with permission) this book from a cafe, because having started it I was hooked. It’s a 2011 science fiction novel written by Andy Weir, adapted into a 2015 film directed by Ridley Scott and starring Matt Damon.

It appealed to my inner geek, as well as my interest in science and space exploration, but what completely sold it to me was an endorsement by a real-life astronaut Chris Hadfield: A book I just couldn’t put down! It has the very rare combination of a good, original story, interestingly real characters and fascinating technical accuracy.

If I had the time I would have probably read it in one sitting, but I’m currently half-way through it. It’s fast-paced, in fairly short chapters, with brief sections, and this all makes for an easy read. I’ve known about the book and film since they came out, so I’m a little late to the party, but better late than never! I look forward to finishing the book and catching up with the film sometime.

Update: I finished the book (a really gripping read) and Naomi bought me the DVD, so we snuggled on the sofa to watch it. All in all, a great book and film.

I, Daniel Blake

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Although I’d seen it before, I watched I, Daniel Blake with Naomi (watching for the first time) last night. Like the first time, it made me sad and angry in equal measure, as well as bringing tears to my eyes.

Daniel is unable to work because of his health situation, and he has to battle a welfare system that should work for him, but which in reality works against him. There is one lady (within the system) who tries to treat him with dignity and help him, a little like a flower growing through a crack in hard concrete; sadly, the weight of the system comes down on her, like a heavy boot.

He makes profound statements of his humanity in two very powerful scenes; one depicted above, the other in the final scene (which I’ll leave for those who haven’t seen it). This is a must-see movie (directed by Ken Loach) if you have a heart for the vulnerable within our society and our common humanity.