Aqualung (Jethro Tull)

The classic and influential Aqualung album by Jethro Tull is 50 years old today (19 March 2021). I bought it on vinyl soon after its release in 1971 and have listened to it countless times since. It impressed me then, and continues to inspire me today. It’s a very thought provoking and challenging album using language in ways that may offend, but to powerful effect.

With its iconic cover and distinctive opening, it’s a concept album focusing on the differences between organised religion and God. It’s been described as musical musings on faith and religion.

The album also links in the themes of homelessness and poverty, with the title track perfectly describing the life of a homeless man, ‘you snatch your rattling last breaths, with deep-sea-diver sounds’. The Salvation Army even gets a mention, ‘Feeling alone, the Army’s up the road, Salvation a la mode and a cup of tea’.

The album covers many genres, with some great guitar work, and the distinctive flute sound of Ian Anderson (an instrument not common on rock albums, but central to the sound of Jethro Tull). This is an album unlike any other, and the best way to appreciate it is to simply give it a listen.


Here are some lyric tasters:


People, what have you done?
Locked him in his golden cage, golden cage,
Made him bend to your religion,
Him resurrected from the grave, from the grave.

He is the God of nothing,
If that’s all that you can see.
You are the God of everything,
He’s inside you and me.

And the bloody church of England,
In chains of history,
Requests your earthly presence,
At the vicarage for tea.


Well, the lush separation enfolds you,
And the products of wealth,
Push you along on the bow wave,
Of their spiritless undying selves.
And you press on God’s waiter your last dime,
As he hands you the bill,
And you spin in the slipstream,
Timeless, unreasoning,
Paddle right out of the mess,
And you paddle right out of the mess.


And I asked this God a question,
And by way of firm reply,
He said: “I’m not the kind you have to wind up on Sundays”.

Well, you can excommunicate me on my way to Sunday school,
And have all the bishops harmonise these lines.


Earth (EOB/Ed O’Brien)

I’m retrospectively listing this album as a favourite of 2020 as I missed it when it came out in April 2020, probably because of the moniker EOB and the fact that a lot was going on in my life then. You can see all my favourite 2020 albums by clicking here.

Earth is the debut solo album by Ed O’Brien, one of the guitarists of Radiohead, its brilliance was unmistakable on my first listen.

Living in Brazil since 2012, the album was inspired by the spirit and being in Brazil, open-heartedness, rhythm, and colour, as well as the Primal Scream album Screamadelica (1991). Primarily an alternative rock, post-Britpop, and dance-rock album, Earth features elements of tropical dance, bossa nova, and punk funk.

It’s a highly original album, with (for me anyway) some ‘wow’ moments. It’s been described as ‘a reassuring anchor in these chaotic times’. Believe me, it’s well worth a listen.