Hidden in Plain Sight

Modern slavery is often hidden in plain sight, right in front of us. It’s happening on our streets and in our towns, and awareness is a key to combating it.

Hidden in Plain Sight is a short video which shows how anyone could come across men and women held in slavery in places they visit, like nail bars, car washes and cafes in any corner of the UK, meeting the demand for cheap goods and services. It illustrates, in a compelling and cinematic way, the visible signs of modern slavery in everyday life,

The Salvation Army provides specialist support through a Government contract to rescued victims of modern slavery to help them begin to rebuild their lives. Modern slavery is sadly growing with more than 10,000 people being referred to The Salvation Army for support since 2011.

Victims frequently say they believed their traffickers when told that no-one would help them if they escaped. The Hidden in Plain Sight film ends with an opening door and a message that the Salvation Army will believe them and is ready to help. The film was gifted to the Salvation Army by director Alex Haines and the Fat Lemon Production Company.

Hidden in Plain Sight has been shortlisted in the 2020 Charity Film Awards and public votes are now needed to take the film to the finals. Please click on the link to vote, so that more people will see it. You could make a huge difference.

You can take action against modern slavery by spreading the word, sharing the video, learning how to spot the signs, and donating to help provide essential support to the thousands of people still caught in slavery today.

See also here: Unseen Promise

Staying Friends on Social Media

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The algorithms of social media often dictate that we live within an echo chamber of friends who share our outlook on life. But not everyone agrees with us, nor do we always agree with others. The old adage of ‘agreeing to disagree agreeably’ sometimes goes out of the window when passions run high, and social media can be a catalyst to entrench our opinions and polarise debate.

In an increasingly divisive society, we may need to relearn the concept of being nice, affirming each other and appreciating diversity.

When I post something on Facebook I expect disagreement, but I don’t expect rudeness. People can get so angry that others have a different, well-considered opinion from them, one that may be part of their very being.

Often on social media there is no engagement with the issue(s), just simply shouting an alternative opinion, with no concept of nuance in any discussion. We are not heard by shouting. There needs to be respect, both for ourselves and for others. It’s also perfectly acceptable to admit the merits of someone else’s position whilst not necessarily agreeing with it ourselves.

Please don’t think that I’m saying I’m perfect in this regard, I’m not. But I do feel we all need to take a careful and humble look at ourselves and how we respond to things posted on Facebook and social media generally.

Personally, I approach this as a person of faith, and so many of my attitudes, thoughts and actions derive from this and make me the person I am.

Paul writing to the Philippians says: Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit. Rather, in humility value others above yourselves, not looking to your own interests but each of you to the interests of the others.

Here is the context of the whole passage, where Paul suggests we should have the same mindset as Christ Jesus. Be kind to each other.

Is self-denial old-fashioned?

1 In the Beginning from The Salvation Army UK & Ireland on Vimeo.

In some ways, I suppose it could be said that self-denial is an old-fashioned concept, but there are many instances of people who give of themselves to love and support others, sometimes even people they don’t know personally.

The Salvation Army in the UK and Ireland is currently in a period of ‘Self-Denial’ (which partially coincides with Lent in the Christian calendar) when we consider giving sacrificially to support the work of the Salvation Army in other countries.

This year we are especially focusing on Burkina Faso in West Africa, and over five weeks are watching short videos (as part of our weekly worship meetings) showing the work of the Salvation Army in this country, before giving in an ‘Altar Service’ on the fifth week when we bring our financial gift forward in worship and place it on an open Bible.

I’ve embedded the first video into this post, but the others can be found by clicking on the links below.

2 The Road to Faith
3 Stirring Things Up
4 Sowing Seeds
5 Growing Saints

One of the concerns in Burkina Faso at the moment is terrorist attacks, many of which are directed at the Christian Church. Indeed, two such fatal attacks have taken place since we started considering the work in this country. Please remember Burkina Faso in your prayers and give generously. If you’re not connected with the Salvation Army, you can find more information here.

Update: The day after this post was published another deadly attack was reported: Gunmen have killed 24 people and wounded 18 others in an attack on a Protestant church in a village in northern Burkina Faso.

Coming out as gay

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I write as a straight man, even though someone once found my website using the phrase ‘is john ager gay’, but also as someone who seeks to empathise and understand those who struggle with their sexuality and societal attitudes.

It came as a complete surprise when I heard this morning that Phillip Schofield had come out as gay, even if there were those who said they always knew.

Much has already been spoken and written about this, and I can’t possibly (nor do I intend to) cover all the issues raised by this announcement. However, I would like to raise questions of why it’s so difficult for people to come out, and why can’t people be allowed to be who they are in the first place?

I found a number of well-articulated comments on Twitter helpful in this important discussion and I leave them with you:

Owen Jones: It’s up to all LGBTQ people how or when or whether they come out. But when someone with a public platform comes out, it helps people who are struggling with their sexuality. Love and support to [Phillip Scofield]

Patrick Strudwick: Next year will be 30 yrs since I came out. (14, at my comprehensive school, it stopped me killing myself). To STILL see people trapped in the closet for decades before having desperate, highly-charged comings out reveals how little things have changed. We have so much more to do.

Sam Wise: [Phillip Schofield] grew up in a time when gay people didn’t have any rights and nobody can blame him for feeling he could not come out. Still today homophobia is alive in our society and people in the public eye feel they can’t be who they are…the fact that [he] has only felt able [to] come out now says more about our society than it does him. He’s made a courageous step today and the fact his wife and kids are right behind him with love and support is excellent.

Coming to terms with and being your authentic self is never easy, especially in the public eye. Phillip and his family deserve our love and support.

Time to Talk Day

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We live in an uncertain world, with many pressures in our day to day lives. The reality is that 1 in 4 of us will experience a mental health problem in any given year, so there has never been a better time to open up about the mental health challenges we face. The more conversations we have about mental health, the more myths we can bust and barriers we can break down, helping to end the isolation, shame and worthlessness that too many of us feel when experiencing a mental health problem.

Having had my own mental health issues in the past (although anxiety, stress and depression can still affect me) this is my heartfelt plea for everyone to open up and talk at more than just a superficial level.

The annual Time to Talk Day provides an opportunity for everyone to add to the wider conversation on social media, television and elsewhere. Here is an opportunity to reach out to others in meaningful ways and help address mental health stigma in society.

Dear friends…

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I completely and passionately remain (did you see what I did there?) of the view that the decision of the UK to leave the EU is fatally flawed. I believe some dark forces have been at work, and feel (like many Remainers) that something of my identity has been taken away. Passions run high.

But things have changed, Brexit is happening and the legal process of leaving has begun, although the full effects will not be felt until the end of the transition period in eleven months time.

It was a divisive referendum in 2016 and continues to be a bitter debate which has divided friends and split families, but now is the time for us all to come together and start healing those divisions.

It’s not the outcome I wanted, but both Leavers and Remainers need to take positive steps to understand each other and work together for the common good, because we all want what’s best for the UK.

I apologise if any of my comments or posts have caused offence over the last few years, and I hope for a similar response from others. My views haven’t changed, I need to remain true to myself, but let’s all agree to disagree agreeably and move forward together. After all, relationships are what life is ultimately about.

PS – I’ll try very hard not to say ‘I told you so’ when things go wrong, but I can’t promise. We’re all human. John.

An Understanding Brexiter

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Even though I profoundly disagree with Conservative MP Steve Baker, he fully understands the sadness and sorrow Remainers are feeling today as the UK leaves the EU. “I will celebrate. I will allow myself a smile, I’ll allow myself that glass of champagne, I will enjoy myself. But I’ll celebrate discreetly, and I will celebrate in a way which is respectful of the genuine sorrow that others are feeling at the same time.” Thank you for your empathy and understanding.

Update: Since posting this a number of people have challenged me about this and why I’m praising an architect of Brexit. My reply: I’m not a Steve Baker fan, but his attitude towards today is a million times better than Farage. That’s all I’m saying.