Marriage Allowance Tax Benefits

In the UK, the HMRC allows you transfer £1,250 of your personal tax allowance to your husband, wife or civil partner. This reduces the overall amount of tax you pay as a couple, and it can be backdated for a number of years. It’s a genuine scheme that may benefit some (but not all) couples, although they don’t advertise it very well.

It’s easy to claim this via the HMRC website, or (as we did recently) by telephone. The only problem we encountered was a long wait to get through to someone, but when we did they were very helpful.

There’s nothing to pay, and possibly lots to gain.

Beware googling ‘marriage tax allowance’. Some shyster firms will charge you for applying (they try to look official), but it’s FREE to apply. Follow our guide and the correct links below to do it safely and at no cost. Source

Unfortunately, there are many companies who offer to do it for you, and charge you up to (and sometimes over) 50% of any backdated tax refund. This could be over £500 for something you can easily do yourself, they simply require the same information you have to give HMRC. They are totally legal scams.

The HMRC website and the one quoted above are really helpful.

Note: I’m not an accountant and this post isn’t financial advice, merely pointing out something you might benefit from and a danger to be aware of. Please do your own homework and make your own financial decisions.

Make a donation: If (as a result of reading this) you save some money, please consider making a donation towards the running costs of this non-profit and free from advertising blog. Click here. Regards, John.

To be, or not to be (Hamlet)

To be, or not to be, that is the question:
Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles
And by opposing end them. To die—to sleep,
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to: ’tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish’d. To die, to sleep;
To sleep, perchance to dream—ay, there’s the rub:
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come,
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause—there’s the respect
That makes calamity of so long life.
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
Th’oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s contumely,
The pangs of dispriz’d love, the law’s delay,
The insolence of office, and the spurns
That patient merit of th’unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? Who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscovere’d country, from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will,
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?
Thus conscience doth make cowards of us all,
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pith and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry
And lose the name of action.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616)