Casio G-Shock Hand Alignment Fix

My main everyday watch is a Casio G-Shock that’s radio-controlled and solar-powered, and I absolutely love it. Imagine my feelings when the analogue hands went out of alignment and nothing I tried fixed the problem! Fortunately, I found this video and solved the problem.

I share the video here in case anyone else has the same problem.

Video Description: Although it should be rare, it is possible that the hands on an analog/digital watch will drift out of alignment with the digital time display. If the analogue time and the digital time don’t match, there’s a simple way to adjust the hands and bring them into sync again with the digital time.

In this video I demonstrate the hand realignment process. These instructions are specific to models of the Casio G-Shock AWG-M100 watches or any other watch which might use Casio’s Model 5230, like the AWG-M510. You can download the complete, official manual for that module from Casio’s website.

These watches are shock-resistant but it’s still possible that extreme shocks, shaking, hard knocks, etc. can cause the hands to drift out of alignment. Another possible cause for an alignment problem might be that the watch has been exposed to strong magnetism. Have no fear. Just try this simple procedure then protect your watch from shocks and magnetism and, in almost all cases, you won’t have an alignment problem again. If you’re asking “Why don’t the watch hand match the time?” or “Why are the G-Shock hands out of sync?” or “Why are the hands off?” …then maybe this video will help you. Greg Anderson.

See also: No one wants a slow watch!

No one wants a slow watch!

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No one wants a slow watch, or do they? In our busy world, maybe we need to think again about the meaning of time and how we can best live in the present. The present is the only time we’re given to live in, the past has gone and the future is not guaranteed.

Last year (as our family is now complete and we’d celebrated our fifth wedding anniversary) I decided to buy Naomi an eternity ring, and because she knew I’d had my eye on a Slow Watch for a while, she bought me the watch in the photograph as an early retirement present (I retire in July this year).

I’ve had an app called TerraTime Pro on my mobile for a while now, and this has the concept of an hour hand that rotates once every twenty-four hours, rather than once every twelve hours. The idea is to reconnect with the rhythms of earth and sun, night and day, moon and stars. This is also the concept behind the one-hand of the Slow Watch.

A Slow Watch allows you to see the entire day in one view and experience time in a natural way. It fundamentally changes the way you look at your watch and gives a much better consciousness about the progression of the day. With only one glance at the watch, I get a good orientation of where I am in the day. Taking a closer look, I get a precise enough indication of the time.

This way of showing the time is inspired by the original clocks that were based on the sun clock. Those early clocks had only one hand and displayed all twenty-four hours, and you can still see them on some old church towers.

In modern life it’s so easy to chase the minutes and get stressed by time, maybe we’d all benefit from turning back time and being slow again.

Mind you, I currently only tend to wear it on my day off or holidays. Perhaps I’ll wear it more when I retire.