Reject Blue Monday

Today is the third Monday in January, a day designated as Blue Monday, the most depressing day of the year in the northern hemisphere.

Unfortunately, this trivial label actually damages our understanding of mental health, just for the sake of a superficial piece of clickbait. Yes, I guess my title is itself clickbait, but if this article helps you to understand actual depression better it will have achieved its purpose.

We all know that in a normal year January can be a difficult month for our mental health (for a variety of reasons) and 2021 is not a normal year. So, even though the concept of Blue Monday appears to make sense, I feel we should reject it even more this year. The very real challenges we face this January make my premise even stronger this year, Blue Monday just isn’t real.

You’ll hear people say that it’s been worked out using a ‘scientific formula’. In fact, it first appeared as part of an advertising campaign for a holiday company, hardly the rigorous, evidence-based approach we might expect. Even the person whose name was on the original press release has since distanced himself from Blue Monday, admitting he was paid to help sell holidays. He now campaigns against Blue Monday.

Having said all that, the date continues to surface every January, and is increasingly linked to mental health and depression. In fact, it’s simply a day when we’re all supposed to feel a bit down, but even that is far-fetched if you give it some thought and view it through the lens of common sense.

A few years ago, the charity Mind attempted to dispel the myth that Blue Monday had anything to do with depression.

Depression is NOT something that happens one day and disappears the next, as if it has trivial ’causes’. Blue Monday is mumbo jumbo, pseudoscience that only serves to add to damaging preconceptions about depression and trivialises a serious illness that can be life-threatening. Depression has nothing to do with the third Monday in January.

The idea that depression is basically the same as feeling low is very pervasive within society, as if it’s ’caused’ by trivial things with the ‘cure’ a matter of ‘pulling yourself together’. Facile responses to depression, such as ‘cheer up’, merely reinforce the preconception it can easily be shaken off with determination and effort. This is not the case, depression is NOT the same as having a bad day.

Depression is way more than simply feeling a bit low, and this is what’s difficult for some people to grasp. It’s about guilt, feelings of worthlessness, lack of motivation, and a sense of emptiness, with simple tasks seemingly impossible to achieve. But there’s also the physical symptoms; headaches, aches and pains, lack of appetite, and sleep disturbances. On top of this can come insidious suicidal thoughts.

It’s an insult to think that the mental and physical complexity of depression can be encapsulated in a catchy named day. The negative things in everyday life that get us down are NOT the things that cause depression, it’s NOT something ‘catch’ from our circumstances. Yes, they can affect our mental health adversely, but they don’t cause depression. Depression can happen in good times.

The ‘why’ of depression is a complex and multi-faceted question. Please don’t trivialise it by falling for a gimmick, reject Blue Monday!

Finally, here’s a Blue Monday we mustn’t reject, enjoy! Click here.

The 2000s – Album of the Decade

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Having recently posted my album of the 2010s decade I’ve gone back retrospectively and compiled my favourite album(s) of each year of the 2000s in order to choose my album of that decade.

You might be surprised by one (if not more) of the choices, but I have written about my musical eclecticism here. I’m not one to shy away from a particular group or musician simply because some might consider that choice as ‘uncool’ to like.

Listed below are over 30 of my favourite albums, and you’ll see that 2001 was a good year with 9 favourites altogether. Choosing my album of the 2010s decade was easy, the album effectively chose itself, but this decade is not so easy.

The Radiohead albums are particular favourites, especially Kid A and Amnesiac, but I’ve actually chosen In Rainbows. It was self-released as a pay-what-you-want download. This was a first for a major act and it made headlines around the world and sparked debate about implications for the music industry. So In Rainbows has significance over and above the music itself.

2000 Radiohead: Kid A
2000 PJ Harvey: Stories from the City, Stories from the Sea
2001 Anne Sofie von Otter & Elvis Costello: For the Stars
2001 Barry Manilow: Here at the Mayflower
2001 Björk: Vespertine
2001 Diana Krall: The Look of Love
2001 Gary Moore: Back to the Blues
2001 Mary J. Blige: No More Drama
2001 New Order: Get Ready
2001 Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds: No More Shall We Part
2001 Radiohead: Amnesiac
2002 Coldplay: A Rush of Blood to the Head
2002 David Bowie: Heathen
2002 Elvis Costello: When I Was Cruel (see also here)
2002 Sigur Rós: ( )
2003 David Bowie: Reality
2003 Elvis Costello: North
2003 Joss Stone: The Soul Sessions
2003 Radiohead: Hail to the Thief
2004 David Byrne: Grown Backwards
2004 Diana Krall: The Girl in the Other Room
2004 Franz Ferdinand: Franz Ferdinand
2004 Morrissey: You Are the Quarry
2005 Martha Wainwright: Martha Wainwright
2005 Sigur Rós: Takk…
2006 Amy Winehouse: Back to Black
2006 David Gilmour: On an Island
2006 Thom Yorke: The Eraser
2007 Radiohead: In Rainbows
2007 Robert PlantAlison Krauss: Raising Sand
2008 David Gilmour: Live in Gdańsk
2008 Metallica: Death Magnetic
2008 Portishead: Third
2008 The Fall: Imperial Wax Solvent
2009 Placebo: Battle for the Sun
2009 U2: No Line on the Horizon

This is the official video of the track House of Cards.