A Spitfire Roared (1936)

An evocative and emblematic sound of victory in the Second World War, the first British Spitfire roared into life on this day (5 March) in 1936. This iconic aeroplane first took to the skies at Eastleigh Aerodrome and soared above the airfield for eight minutes, powered by a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine.

The Spitfire is a superbly balanced, high-performance aircraft that could be flown by fairly inexperienced pilots, and it gave the RAF a decisive advantage in the Battle of Britain in 1940. When Hermann Göring asked his pilots in a speech if there was anything they needed, they shouted back, ‘Ja, Spitfires!

Dan Snow writes: The chairman of the Vickers-Armstrong aircraft company named the plane after his young daughter, Anna, who he said was a ‘right little spitfire’. The genius responsible for the plane, Reginald Mitchell grumbled, ‘It’s the sort of bloody silly name they would give it.’ Source

Today, we couldn’t imagine it being called anything else!

Our names are on Mars!

The Mars 2020 Perseverance Rover recently landed successfully on Mars and immediately started sending photos, videos, and information back to Earth. You can follow the mission here.

Before the mission launched we sent our names to NASA and these are now on Mars, the above photo is Pollyanna’s boarding pass. Who knows if our children will ever make it to Mars, but if they do, their names will already be waiting for them!

The Mars 2020 Perseverance Rover will search for signs of ancient microbial life, which will advance NASA’s quest to explore the past habitability of Mars. The rover has a drill to collect core samples of Martian rock and soil, then store them in sealed tubes for pickup by a future mission that would ferry them back to Earth for detailed analysis. Perseverance will also test technologies to help pave the way for future human exploration of Mars. Source

Home Schooling (Dolphins)

Home schooling can be quite a challenge sometimes, but it was an absolute delight learning about dolphins with Matilda (4). The task set by her teacher was to watch a video and then answer some questions in an online worksheet.

Dolphins sleep with one eye open, because they sleep with only one half of their brain (in four hourly periods). This is so they can keep on breathing and not drown; I needed to explain to Matilda that they’re mammals and not fish. It also ensures they can look out for danger, keeping their muscles working to maintain their body temperature. They also have their own name, watch the video! They can’t smell, but do use echolocation to identify dangers before they can see them.

We also learnt that dolphins eat fish, squid, and octopus, amongst other things, to which Matilda replied, “But octopus don’t like being eaten.”

Note: While learning about sleeping with one eye open, I couldn’t helping thinking about Enter Sandman by Metallica.