Marriage Allowance Tax Benefits

In the UK, the HMRC allows you transfer £1,250 of your personal tax allowance to your husband, wife or civil partner. This reduces the overall amount of tax you pay as a couple, and it can be backdated for a number of years. It’s a genuine scheme that may benefit some (but not all) couples, although they don’t advertise it very well.

It’s easy to claim this via the HMRC website, or (as we did recently) by telephone. The only problem we encountered was a long wait to get through to someone, but when we did they were very helpful.

There’s nothing to pay, and possibly lots to gain.

Beware googling ‘marriage tax allowance’. Some shyster firms will charge you for applying (they try to look official), but it’s FREE to apply. Follow our guide and the correct links below to do it safely and at no cost. Source

Unfortunately, there are many companies who offer to do it for you, and charge you up to (and sometimes over) 50% of any backdated tax refund. This could be over £500 for something you can easily do yourself, they simply require the same information you have to give HMRC. They are totally legal scams.

The HMRC website and the one quoted above are really helpful.

Note: I’m not an accountant and this post isn’t financial advice, merely pointing out something you might benefit from and a danger to be aware of. Please do your own homework and make your own financial decisions.

Make a donation: If (as a result of reading this) you save some money, please consider making a donation towards the running costs of this non-profit and free from advertising blog. Click here. Regards, John.

Stargazing with Matilda

Home schooling is a very real and present challenge (understatement) for millions of parents and families in the coronavirus lockdown, but Matilda and I had an enjoyable adventure at the end of what has been a tough day. There was a homework task in her school app inbox from before Christmas, to explore the night sky. So off we went in the car (including Chippy the Elf, don’t ask) to a quiet country lane a few miles from home.

Winter is the best time to explore the night sky in the northern hemisphere, because it’s darker than the summer (obviously) and because there are more distinctive constellations, with Orion dominating.

It was muddy and windy (my flat cap blew off) and a little scary for Matilda, but we had a great time and saw some wonderful objects in the night sky once our eyes had adjusted.

The most obvious object in the sky was the Moon with Mars and Uranus appearing close in the sky, although the latter is too faint to see with the naked eye unless the location is exceptionally dark. We saw the dramatic constellation of Orion and used his belt (three stars in a line) to point down to Sirius (the brightest star in the night sky) and upwards to the constellation of Taurus and the Pleiades star cluster. We spotted the distinctive W (or M) shape of the constellation Cassiopeia, and the plough shape of Ursa Major.

It was a very short lesson as Matilda soon wanted to get back into the car, but we could still see quite a lot inside the car and on the way home. A positive experience of home schooling at the end of the day.