Albums that missed out in 2021

You can see my favourite albums of 2021 here, these are the ones that just missed out for a variety of reasons. They’re all good, but I had to draw the line somewhere.

Lost (Cousin Silas)

Riding on the Tide of Love (Deacon Blue)

Fear of an Obtuse Earth (Home Brewed Universe)

Home (Rhye)

Under a Mediterranean Sky (Steve Hackett)

The Future Bites (Steven Wilson)

Mars Perseverance (Various Artists)

This post is a work in progress and subject to change and revision.

Mars Perseverance (Album)

To commemorate the new Mars Perseverance Rover landing on February 18, 2021, Aural Films presents a collection of new music inspired by the Mars Mission composed by 37 artists from around the world. Listen to this extended soundtrack of more than 4 hours of new music celebrating the Mars Perseverance Rover landing.

All proceeds from this project will be donated to the Feeding America project who are working to support over 25 million people that do not have food. Please lend a hand by purchasing this album to help others and get over 4 hours of great space music for your support.

Read more (with links) here: Mars Perseverance

Lost (Cousin Silas)

Lost by Cousin Silas is a companion album to Submerged released in January 2021. These are some wonderful ambient soundscapes in which to immerse yourself and release your imagination.

Cousin Silas writes, this collection contains lost settlements not related to reservoirs or coastal erosion. I find it incredibly intriguing that the reason why some of these places became ‘lost’ or abandoned still continues to be unknown, or only guessed at. It’s surprising just how many lost settlements there are in the UK. Each and every one has, be they lost to history, a tale to tell.

Collapsed in Sunbeams (Arlo Parks)

Arlo Parks‘ debut album Collapsed in Sunbeams became an instant favourite on first hearing, it stood out as an exceptional piece of work. The album [has] received widespread acclaim, with many music critics praising Parks’ versatility and vulnerability. Wikipedia

She has described the album as a series of vignettes and intimate portraits surrounding her adolescence and the people who shaped it, one that’s rooted in storytelling and nostalgia. It was recorded during the coronavirus lockdown, mining deep-rooted, sometimes traumatic places at a time when the world was crumbling around her.

A universal collection of stories that’ll provide solace for listeners of all ages and backgrounds for decades to come. Her music is like a warm hug, a reassurance that everything is going to be OK when the world is dark and things seem out of control. True to form, her debut album is a sanctuary of compassionate lyricism and groove-along tunes. NME

This is a great album, and well worth a listen. You can see all my favourite albums of 2021 by clicking here.

Apocalypse (Jack Hertz)

Jack Hertz has been composing and recording for more than thirty years. He’s fascinated by all aspects of creating sound, from the earliest instruments to the present day hardware and software innovations. I’ve been listening to his albums for many years now, and one of his albums (released in two versions) features one of my photos (see note below).

His January 2021 album Apocalypse: Lifting of the Veil is one of my favourites of the year, comprising eight imaginative soundscapes. You can see all my favourite albums of 2021 by clicking here.

An apocalypse is a revelation: seeing something which has been hidden. It comes from the Greek word, Apokálypsis, which means “lifting of the veil”, or finding out something secret. Often this secret is discovered in a dream or a vision. Bandcamp

Note: The album, with my photo on the cover, mentioned above is available in two versions, Gilded Skies and Gilded Sky (click on the links).

Submerged (Cousin Silas)

Having finished writing about my favourite albums of 2020, it’s time to turn to 2021. Submerged by Cousin Silas is my first favourite album of 2021. These are some wonderful ambient soundscapes in which to immerse yourself and release your imagination. You can stream and/or download the album here.

Cousin Silas writes: Abandoned villages, for me, are fascinating places. The lost history, the forgotten lives and the long gone murmur of rural life. What I find more intriguing, however, are those select few villages that have been lost with coastal erosion, or abandoned due to the valley where they were situated being ‘converted’ into reservoirs. In some cases parts of the buildings occasionally, during droughts or low tides, emerge. Urban legends of bells tolling from the old church, be that submerged or managing to breath again as the water slowly recedes.

All seven tracks are named, and partially inspired, by submerged villages. Obviously there are many more across the UK, but most featured are relatively ‘local’, or at least in Yorkshire and there’s varying degrees of information about them on the Internet. Who’d have thought you could learn history whilst submerging yourself in music? Bandcamp

You can see all my favourite albums of 2021 by clicking here.

See also: Lost (Cousin Silas)